Eating with the Day

by Wayne Corley 06/23/2019

The modern human doesn’t always follow the natural order of things. For example, we often eat by the clock. We eat in the morning before work or school whether we are hungry or not. We snack at our morning coffee break. Then our lunchtime schedule again must coincide with our workplace or school day schedule. In the evenings, however, it seems we have more control over our appetite. Sometimes, though, even our evening meals don’t follow the plan we intend. We have after school or after work activities, homework, projects, social times. All sorts of things dictate our meal times. But the thing we rarely pay attention to is our natural rhythm.

Circadian rhythm: eating with the day

According to recent research, healthy eating may be less about what is on our plate as it is about when it’s on our plate. In fact, the latest science reveals that when we eat may be a more significant factor than what we eat. The truth is that our three-square meals may not jive with the rhythm of our metabolism.

Your metabolism is your body’s energy usage. Your circadian rhythm is your body’s internal clock that tells your body what it needs when it needs it. And a more natural way to align your body’s internal clock is not with your smartwatch. It’s with the sun.

So, if your job dictates that you rise before the sun is up most of the year, forcing your body to digest food that early might be preventing you from losing weight. The research shows that eating outside your body’s circadian rhythm might increase being overweight, metabolic syndrome and diabetes, and even up your risk of cardiovascular disease.

Aligning your eating times with your natural daily cycle improves weight loss, increase energy, and improve your general health. How do you do it?

- Follow the sun. Don’t eat before the sun rises in the morning. But once the sun is up, break your fast with something. Morning calories seem to burn more quickly than calories consumed later in the day since your body is replenishing what is used up overnight.

- Stop eating in the afternoon. The studies showed that eating past mid-afternoon (about 3 PM) hindered weight loss in the study participants; while those that stopped eating by the middle of the afternoon tended to lose more weight than their cohorts. 

- Additionally, better results came from eating the highest caloric meal at breakfast with a smaller lunch and even smaller dinner.

- Keep your eating inside an eight-hour window. That means starting your first meal and ending your last meal within the window and not eating or fasting for the remaining 16 hours of the evening and overnight.

Consider trying this eating cycle for 30 days and enlist family members to join you. You may just love you’re your new rhythm of life.

About the Author
Author

Wayne Corley

Born in Detroit, Michigan, Wayne Corley was raised in Central City, Kentucky then attended high school in Ogden, Utah. After a year at Columbia University he graduated with a B.A. in Business Psychology from Occidental College in Los Angeles, CA. 

After two years of serving in the Peace Corps in Sabah, Malaysia, Wayne returned to the USA and work in a variety of positions in the hospitality industry in Southern California, Rhode Island and Virginia in the 70's.

In the 80's Wayne developed Lake Vista in Forest, a 750-acre planned development in Forest, Virginia. He was also President of the Greater Lynchburg Chamber of Commerce, Chairman of Greater Lynchburg's Vision 2001,and on the Board of Directors of The Community Bank of Forest.

In 1995, Wayne and his wife, Kathy, moved to Salem, Massachusetts where Wayne became the founding Executive Director of the Salem State College Assistance Corporation, transforming a former industrial site adjacent to the college into a business incubator, The Enterprise Center at Salem State University. 

In 1999, Dr. Kathy Corley was hired by the Beaufort County Board of Education to open the new Bluffton Elementary School, and the couple moved to the Low country. Kathy is now the principal of Red Cedar Elementary School in Bluffton. 

In 2000, Wayne joined Harden Tuten Custom Homes and became the Director of Sales and Marketing until 2012. He has been a licensed real estate broker since 2005. As an Associate Broker with Charter One Realty, he specializes in the listing, marketing, and sales of luxury properties in the Bluffton-Hilton Head area private golf communities. 

Wayne is a 2006 graduate of the Hilton Head-Bluffton Chamber of Commerce Leadership Program and has served as Chairman of the Board of the Palmetto Chapter of the American Red Cross and as a member of the Beaufort County Tax Equalization Board. Wayne's experience in real estate and the sales and marketing of custom homes in communities throughout the Low country brings an added benefit to clients seeking to purchase, sell, or build residential properties.